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2018 Annual Report2018 Annual Report

Together, we’re changing the lives of amputees.


Thank You

Your support of the Key Tag Service allows us to continue our vital programs for all amputees!

CHAMP Nikan

It was a notable year for The War Amps as we commemorated our 100 years of service for amputees in Canada – a milestone we could not have reached without our donors like you. We also greatly appreciate the contributions of our corporate and foundation donors and those who have left charitable estate donations in their wills. All of your support ensures that our many life‑changing programs for amputees continue to grow and evolve to meet their needs, now and in the future.

In 1918, when First World War amputees formed The War Amps, never could they have imagined their legacy would still be going strong a century later. It was an uphill battle as they confronted the stigma of disability at that time, pushed for advancements in prosthetics and fought for fair government pensions for veterans.

They welcomed the Second World War “amps” back home with information, support and friendship, and started the Key Tag Service to provide meaningful employment to those unable to return to their pre‑war jobs. The idea required the participation and goodwill of citizens who found lost keys to put them in a mailbox for return, and it was a resounding success from the start.

As years passed, the war amputees recognized their knowledge and experience could help others. It was a turning point in the Association’s history as they made the remarkable decision to offer assistance where none had been available by developing programs to serve all amputees – including, of course, the renowned Child Amputee (CHAMP) Program.

Today, it is heartwarming to acknowledge how your donations allow us to carry on this legacy. There is still much to do to ensure amputees receive the artificial limbs they need for their independence, safety and security – including educating the government and insurance companies on the medical necessity of artificial limbs. Because you help, we are able to continue this vital work and fill the gaps in support for Canadians living with amputation.

Please read on to learn more about our many activities in 2018. You can also view an interactive timeline of our 100 years. We welcome your feedback and, as always, remain accountable to you.

Before there was Veterans Affairs Canada, there was The War Amps. In 1918, they were veterans helping one another adapt to their new challenges and advocate for others, and advocate they have. They have led the way. In 1932, they brought together all groups for the National Council of  Veteran Associations. In 1962, they began helping child amputees. … From PoWs to Indigenous veterans to the Merchant Navy, they have been at the forefront. I thank Brian Forbes and his entire War Amps team for 100 years of advocacy for our veterans.”

Erin O’Toole, member of Parliament and former veterans affairs minister, in a statement to the House of Commons

Celebrating 100 Years

Second World War amputee veteran and War Amps member Charlie Jefferson with Champ Dante at the Canada Post commemorative envelope unveiling in Ottawa

Second World War amputee veteran and War Amps member Charlie Jefferson with Champ Dante at the Canada Post commemorative envelope unveiling in Ottawa

As the centre of excellence in amputation, it was an honour to be acknowledged on the national stage by members of Parliament as well as institutions such as Canada Post, the Canadian War Museum and Library and Archives Canada to mark our 100 years of service.

Commemorative Envelope

Commemorative Envelope

The War Amps was pleased to be selected by Canada Post as one of only two organizations to be featured on a commemorative envelope in 2018. Since the Key Tag Service was started in 1946, Canada Post has played an important role in the successful return of lost keys to their owners.


War Museum Exhibition

The Canadian War Museum and Library and Archives Canada recognized The War Amps as a unique service organization in a special exhibition centred on the theme of resilience following the First World War. The exhibition included artifacts from the Association’s history and several works from Canadian artist Mary Riter Hamilton, who was commissioned by The War Amps to paint the battlefields in Europe after the war to capture the devastation before restoration took place.

Second World War amputee veteran and War Amps member Charlie Jefferson with Champ Dante at the Canada Post commemorative envelope unveiling in Ottawa


Second World War amputee veteran and War Amps member Charlie Jefferson with Champ Dante at the Canada Post commemorative envelope unveiling in Ottawa

Financial Assistance for Artificial Limbs

The War Amps provides amputees, including children, with the artificial limbs they need to lead full and active lives.

CHAMP William

“William’s orthopedists put us in contact with the CHAMP Program when he was six months old. A few days later, The War Amps called us and invited us to our first CHAMP Seminar where he made friends who are ‘just like him.’

“Thanks to his everyday limb, William is more independent. He can keep up with his friends and do the same things they do. His water leg has allowed him to go to the beach and go outside to play when it rains. We would like to say thank you to donors for allowing child amputees to take part and not let their amputations stop them from living full lives. Your support is so precious!”

Annie and Bryan, William’s parents
CHAMP Rui

“Thanks to donors, our children can simply participate like everyone else. They would not have the specialized limbs they need without The War Amps, and to be able to have a community of families like ours – to learn and grow with a supportive group of people – is priceless.

“I don’t think the general public realizes that provincial health plans do not cover the cost of specialized limbs at all. Without the support of  War Amps donors, most of these children would not have the limbs they need to take part in activities like other kids. Imagine not being able to run, ride a bike, swim, or throw a ball because your limb wouldn’t allow it. Donations to The War Amps make this possible for children like ours.”

Kurt, Rui’s dad
CHAMP Sophia

“We found out Sophia was going to be missing her left hand during the first ultrasound. We got connected with The War Amps after searching their website and seeing some of the profiles of other child amputees, which really brought us some peace. It has been such a privilege to see Sophia overcome the day‑to‑day challenges that come with being an amputee. She’s able to play the piano and swim, and she’s not afraid to do things differently.

“Sophia’s future looks very bright – with the support of  The War Amps, she has all the tools she needs to succeed. So, to the people who have donated, I say thank you.”

Ryan, Sophia’s dad
CHAMP Florence

“The CHAMP Program allows me to take part in activities and attend seminars to meet other amputees. Thank you very much to donors – you are making a big difference in my life!”

Florence

The War Amps provides adult amputees with financial assistance towards the cost of artificial limbs and a wealth of information about life as an amputee.

“I would like to thank War Amps donors, as without them I would never have gotten a new artificial leg. My old leg had become quite uncomfortable and was affecting my gait. I had to use a cane, and to get around the yard I would use a walker. Now I need neither one. So, again, thanks very much.”

Benjamin

“I would like to thank The War Amps for its contribution towards the construction of my new artificial leg. This new limb now enables me to regain the independence I once knew. Without the generosity of donors, my quality of life would definitely not be the same.”

Luc

“Thank you so much for contributing towards the cost of my partial foot prosthesis. This foot has helped reduce pain in my leg and residual limb and has reduced episodes of inflammation in my hip. The War Amps has been such a big help. I really appreciate this kindness.”

Pam

The War Amps provides adult amputees with financial assistance towards the cost of artificial limbs and a wealth of information about life as an amputee.

“I would like to thank War Amps donors, as without them I would never have gotten a new artificial leg. My old leg had become quite uncomfortable and was affecting my gait. I had to use a cane, and to get around the yard I would use a walker. Now I need neither one. So, again, thanks very much.”

Benjamin

“I would like to thank The War Amps for its contribution towards the construction of my new artificial leg. This new limb now enables me to regain the independence I once knew. Without the generosity of donors, my quality of life would definitely not be the same.”

Luc

“Thank you so much for contributing towards the cost of my partial foot prosthesis. This foot has helped reduce pain in my leg and residual limb and has reduced episodes of inflammation in my hip. The War Amps has been such a big help. I really appreciate this kindness.”

Pam
Daphnée with Vanessa

Daphnée and Vanessa


“Without donors like you, I would not be where I am today. I would not have the artificial limb that I am wearing and all the ones that I have needed growing up. I don’t think I would have the same self‑esteem without The War Amps.”

Daphnée, pictured with Vanessa

“I would like to thank donors for their continued support. The War Amps has helped me and my daughter over the years, preparing Vanessa for a great life. She graduated with a degree in medicine and started a residency in family medicine this past summer. Once again, thank you.”

Lyne, Vanessa’s mom
Your Story

“I realized I lost my keys after taking my dog for a walk one night. I retraced my route the next morning but found nothing. Nine days later, my keys were returned by courier from The War Amps. It was the first time in my life that I have jumped with joy! Thank you so very much.”

Sara

Amputees Helping Amputees

Connecting child amputees and their families to others who have “been there.”

The philosophy of “amputees helping amputees” remains at the core of  The War Amps programs to this day. It was the spirit encouraged by the first Association President Sidney Lambert, an Army Padre who lost his leg during the First World War. Now, child amputees and their families meet and share their experiences with amputation through regional CHAMP seminars, as well as the Matching Mothers Program.

The parents of Jaelynn and Chloe were matched when Jaelynn was just a toddler and – before that – a younger Chloe was matched with Robin. Since then, their families have benefited from the mutual support that comes from being connected to others who have “been there.”

Robin, Chloe, Jaelynn

“Robin helped Chloe growing up, and now Chloe helps me!” – Jaelynn, pictured with Chloe (left) and Robin (right)

“When our daughter Jaelynn was born, we were already aware that she would be missing part of her arm. Not knowing what to expect, it was hard to grasp at the beginning and we had a lot of questions.The War Amps got us in touch with another family going through the same things, and they’ve been so supportive. Emotionally, we know that there will always be someone we can call if we have questions or concerns or just need to talk.

“Chloe has help from older mentors like Robin, and she’s been able to take what she’s learned and pass it on to Jaelynn. When Jaelynn wants to do something and sees Chloe is able to do it, it gives Jaelynn that boost of confidence, and in the future, she can be that support for other children she’s matched with.”

Josephine, Jaelynn’s mom

Advocacy

The War Amps continues its work to achieve fair compensation for seriously disabled veterans.

Maj. Blaise and Montreal Branch Secretary Jean‑Marie Paul are pictured

The War Amps proudly serves war amputees from past and more recent conflicts. (Maj. Blaise and Montreal Branch Secretary Jean‑Marie Paul are pictured.)

The War Amps is the driving force behind the National Council of Veteran Associations in Canada (NCVA), a growing umbrella organization of more than 60 distinct veterans’ associations formed to ensure a strong, independent voice on veterans issues. We continually engage with the Minister and senior hierarchy of Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) to attain legislative reform for war amputees and their families. We are represented on four of the six advisory groups to VAC, including the Policy Advisory Group, for which Brian Forbes, Chairman of  The War Amps Executive Committee and of NCVA, is co‑chair.

Maj. Blaise and Montreal Branch Secretary Jean‑Marie Paul are pictured

The War Amps proudly serves war amputees from past and more recent conflicts. (Maj. Blaise and Montreal Branch Secretary Jean‑Marie Paul are pictured.)


Pursuing more inclusive legislation

The New Veterans Charter of 2006 changed the way the Canadian government issues financial support to veterans. The charter has been criticized by veterans’ groups since its enactment, and despite our frequent calls for reform, many of its shortfalls remain.

Early this year, The War Amps and the NCVA again urged VAC to correct the unjust disparity in compensation for veterans with the same disabilities or incapacities under the charter as compared to the pre‑2006 Pension Act.

“The government has failed to fulfill veterans’ expectations with respect to the prime minister’s 2015 election commitment to ‘re‑establish lifelong pensions’ under the charter to ensure that a comparable level of financial security is provided to all disabled veterans and their families over their life course,” says Forbes.

The “Pension for Life” simply converts the amount of the lump sum disability award into a form of lifetime annuity as an option for those disabled veterans who are eligible. Additionally, the announcement of two new benefits (which essentially duplicate existing benefits) will still have limited applicability and will not materially impact the majority of disabled veterans.

The War Amps and the NCVA’s position, as stated in numerous submissions to VAC, remains that this glaring disparity requires that the government seize the moment and satisfy the financial needs of our veterans and their dependants. We continue to pursue much‑needed changes to the legislation to make it more inclusive prior to its formal implementation.

Matthieu and Amélie are pictured

The War Amps advocates on behalf of all amputees to create widespread, positive changes in funding for artificial limbs both provincially and through private insurers. (Matthieu and Amélie are pictured.)

Crusade for Reform

Building on our long history of advocating for veterans’ rights, The War Amps created the Advocacy Program to formalize this practice and to expand the work to include all amputees who have encountered discrimination or red tape in accessing the services and benefits to which they are entitled. Through this program, The War Amps has continued to reveal many gaps in prosthetic funding and set out on a “Crusade for Reform” to educate the government and private insurers so that all amputees have access to the artificial limbs they need for their safety, security and well‑being.

Matthieu and Amélie are pictured

The War Amps advocates on behalf of all amputees to create widespread, positive changes in funding for artificial limbs both provincially and through private insurers. (Matthieu and Amélie are pictured.)


Calling for changes to provincial funding guidelines

This year, as a first step towards gaining improvements to prosthetic funding across all provinces, The War Amps pushed for changes to the Ontario Assistive Devices Program through media outreach as well as providing feedback to the Office of the Auditor General. We took the Ontario election as a timely opportunity to draw attention to the province’s grossly outdated funding guidelines for artificial limbs, which leave many amputees in desperate circumstances.

The 20‑year‑old funding guidelines cover outdated and obsolete technology while failing to cover the cost of modern‑day essential components. The result is that amputees – if they have the means – must pay thousands of dollars out of pocket for the proper artificial limbs that have been medically prescribed to them. For many, crowdfunding has proven necessary, pointing to a shameful state of affairs for the province’s health‑care system.

“The current funding has been quite accurately referred to as a tiny Band-Aid on a gaping wound, and it means that many Ontario amputees are literally unable to afford a leg to stand on. We’re certain most Ontarians would be shocked to know that if they or a family member lost a limb, they could be faced with a personal balance of thousands of dollars for even the most basic artificial limb that will restore only a semblance of their previous function.”

Annelise Petlock, War Amps Advocacy Program Manager

The War Amps attempts to fill the gaps where it can, contributing thousands of dollars towards the cost of artificial limbs. As a charity relying on public donations, however, our funds can only go so far. To best serve the needs of all amputees, the Association continues to communicate with the provinces to improve the standards of care across the country.

Dispelling the myths of amputation

Education is an integral part of  The War Amps advocacy efforts, as many funding agencies make decisions without a complete understanding of how and why artificial limbs are used and needed. By providing more information about this complex area of health care as the centre of excellence in amputation, The War Amps has continued to help improve insurance policies so that amputees receive the essential artificial limbs they need to lead independent lives.

One case from this year involved Sam, who was eligible for prosthetic care through his employer – a national banking institution. However, the insurance policy excluded some of the artificial limbs he and many other amputees need for daily life, such as knee components. Sam scheduled a meeting with the benefits committee at his workplace to discuss the issue, and The War Amps assisted by providing our new resource booklet Dispelling the Myths: The Reality of Living With Amputation and Prosthetic Care to inform their evaluation of the coverage.

After this meeting and a review of our comprehensive information about amputation, the employer made considerable changes to their prosthetic care policy by updating restrictive language that limited coverage for common limbs and components, increasing payment maximums and frequencies for adults, and increasing replacement frequency for children who outgrow their limbs. The support and co‑operation of this well‑known banking institution in this situation demonstrates that with education, employers can be receptive to updates to their insurance policy coverage for amputees.

Dispelling the Myths

Did You Know?

The War Amps actively engages with prosthetic and orthotic professionals, regulatory bodies, insurers and medical practitioners as part of its advocacy efforts. Through these contacts, we disperse important information about the reality of living with amputation and prosthetic care.

In 2018, we participated in the Orthotics Prosthetics Canada (OPC) national conference, which is the largest gathering of professionals in this field in the country. War Amps representatives raised awareness of our Crusade for Reform through a display and presentation, as well as distributed our new Dispelling the Myths booklets to attendees.

The booklet, developed with input from OPC, aims to shed light on amputation and prosthetic treatment, a unique and often misunderstood disability and area of health care. It presents a comprehensive overview of amputation and prosthetic care with the goal of helping to educate funding decision-makers as well as health-care providers. This year, we also distributed these booklets at presentations to insurers, hospitals and more.

In the Community

A “Kids-to-Kids” Safety Message

One of  The War Amps goals, which began in 1978 with the introduction of the PLAYSAFE Program, is to make children more aware of the dangers in their play environments to prevent injuries. The War Amps believes no one is better qualified to deliver the unique “kids‑to‑kids” safety message than child amputees, many of whom have lost limbs in accidents.

As part of our ongoing outreach through this program, we released the new video, PLAYSAFE: Don’t Let It Happen to You. Speaking from their personal experiences, child amputees living in urban and rural areas share how their accidents happened and, in a message aimed directly at young audiences, they stress the importance of staying away from “mean machines” like lawn mowers, trains, boats, cars and farm equipment.

A valuable resource for families, educators and community groups, the video tackles the crucial subject of child safety in a way that is both hard‑hitting and positive. Our featured Champs give helpful tips about how to choose safe places to play and demonstrate the artificial limbs they wear to lead active lives.

To ensure we reach as many people as possible with this important message, for the first time, we made this production available to stream or download directly from our website, along with safety resources. Since the launch of the video – which has reached more than 18,000 views on our website and YouTube – Champs have been spreading the PLAYSAFE message by hosting video screenings at their schools and in their communities.

Featured Safety Ambassadors

Neveah Jordan Zoe Ernie Kennedy Rebecca Adam Julie
Neveah

Neveah

Neveah was visiting a farm one day and wanted to help by riding on a lawn tractor. She fell off and the blades cut her leg, which resulted in a below the knee amputation. Now, she warns other kids to stay away from lawn mowers and to never, ever ride on one.

When Neveah is not busy being a Safety Ambassador, she likes playing outside, running around the playground and jumping on the trampoline. She also loves animals, especially cats.

“I wouldn’t want someone else to get hurt. It’s very important to PLAYSAFE and be cautious.”
Jordan

Jordan

Jordan was playing in the yard behind a push lawn mower. It was so noisy that the operator didn’t hear him and didn’t know he was there. Jordan slipped and lost part of his foot due to the lawn mower’s blades.

Today, Jordan is a keen soccer player, but he also takes his job as Safety Ambassador very seriously. He helps spread the PLAYSAFE message by riding on board the PLAYSAFE float in local parades, and he gives presentations to schools and community groups.

“I want to share my story so kids can know what it’s like.”
Zoe

Zoe

Running after her dog on the lawn, Zoe slipped on wet grass and fell under a riding mower, an accident that resulted in the loss of her left leg below the knee. She was just four at the time.

Now, as a War Amps Safety Ambassador, Zoe is committed to sharing her story with other kids. She inspires others with her positive attitude and boundless energy.

“I like hop-scotching and I like skip roping and I love lots and lots of things. A prosthetic leg can help me do all kinds of things but it’s not going to be like a regular leg, so PLAYSAFE!”
Ernie

Ernie

Ernie was chasing a dog on the farm when he fell onto the blades of a moving grain auger and lost his arm at the shoulder.

Since then, Ernie has met other amputees in The War Amps CHAMP Program and has learned how to do all kinds of things with his artificial arm. For fun, he plays football, soccer and video games, and keeps busy with farm chores. He likes being a Safety Ambassador so he can prevent other kids from having an accident like he did.

“Kids should stay away from all the machines. Accidents happen fast. I never thought it would happen to me until it did. Now, I teach kids to spot the danger before they play. PLAYSAFE!”
Kennedy

Kennedy

At age 13, Kennedy made a decision that changed her life forever. She and her friends were playing by the railway tracks and decided to hop on a moving train. Kennedy fell off, and her leg went under the wheels. Doctors tried to save her leg but they couldn’t.

After the accident, she had to learn how to walk using an artificial leg. Kennedy enjoys all kinds of sports and plays the cello and saxophone. As a Safety Ambassador, she has a powerful message:

“If I could say anything to kids that are thinking of jumping onto a train or playing near the railroads because it seems like it’s fun or just because your friends do it – don’t do it!”
Rebecca

Rebecca

When she was four, Rebecca lost her leg above the knee in a boating accident. She was standing up in a dinghy when it hit a large wave. She fell overboard and the motor injured her leg.

Today, she is busy swimming, cycling and playing basketball and is a role model for younger amputees. She enjoys being on the water with her family and, as a Safety Ambassador, she likes to teach kids how to boat safely.

“Whether you’re near, in or on the water, it’s good to stay alert. Accidents happen when you least expect it.”
Adam

Adam

At the age of two, Adam ran into the path of a riding lawn mower in his backyard. He lost his leg below the knee.

He’s a teenager now and is active in many sports, including his favourite, hockey, where he plays goalie. Adam has been a War Amps Safety Ambassador for many years, giving PLAYSAFE presentations in schools, appearing in public service announcements on TV and helping out with the PLAYSAFE float in parades.

“I accept who I am today and I wouldn’t change a thing, but I wouldn’t want anyone else to go through what I did, so PLAYSAFE.”
Julie

Julie

When Julie, a teenager who lives in a farming community, tried driving a zero-turn lawn mower for the first time, she was thrown off and the machine ran over her. In what she described as a life-or-death situation, she ended up losing her left leg below the knee.

“As a Safety Ambassador, she wants to remind kids that they’re not invincible.

“I would like to help people and make sure that this doesn’t happen to them. You always think, ‘Oh, that won’t happen to me!’, but you never know. You really have to be careful.”

PLAYSAFE™ Outreach

CHAMP Darevin

Champs spread the PLAYSAFE message in 2018 by giving presentations to schools and community groups, hosting displays at local events, riding on board the PLAYSAFE parade float and appearing in War Amps videos and public service announcements. Together, they warn other children to “Spot the danger before you play!”

CHAMP Darevin

“Kids, if you are listening, please take this note very seriously: stay away from dangerous things like lawn mowers. PLAYSAFE or you could have a serious accident like I had. Don’t let it happen to you.”

Champ Darevin, who lost his foot in a lawn mower accident, in a War Amps public service message

Michayla gave a presentation to a daycare in her community and hosted a War Amps display at her father’s workplace event.

CHAMP Michayla

Michayla gave a presentation to a daycare in her community and hosted a War Amps display at her father’s workplace event.

“Champ Michayla’s presentation was informative and the children found the PLAYSAFE video captivating. She answered questions and allowed the children to hold some of her artificial limbs. Michayla was so polite and caring, and the children felt very comfortable with her. Parents were happy to have their children learning how to be safe and how important it is to be respectful of others!”

Daycare staff member

Operation Legacy

Jericho

Jericho laid a wreath at his local Remembrance Day ceremony in 2018.

Seventy years after establishing The War Amps, war amputee veterans reflected on their life’s work and began to prepare Champs to take up the torch of remembrance. With the motto “It was our war; it is their legacy” at its core, Operation Legacy was created in 1991 to provide a way to pass on the war amputees’ message to the younger generation.

This year, Champs continued to take on an active role in commemorating and preserving Canada’s military heritage, with 91 of them laying wreaths in Remembrance Day ceremonies across the country. They also educated the public through presentations and displays (where Champs distributed more than 2,000 Operation Legacy resource booklets), and by submitting letters to local and national newspapers.

Having adapted the war amputees’ message, the Champs’ motto is: “It was their war; it is our legacy.”

Your Story

“I had misplaced one of my car key fobs about a month ago and the replacement cost is $400. I had searched the whole house looking for the key before finally booking an appointment at the dealership to get a new one. Lo and behold, yesterday my key fob arrived via courier five days before the appointment! Thank you to The War Amps.”

Farid

Employing People With Disabilities

Your support of the Key Tag and Address Label Service makes all of our programs for amputees possible! We do not receive government grants.

The Key Tag Service was established in 1946 to provide war amputees with meaningful employment and a way of continuing to serve their country. It was a popular venture from the start, not only serving as a means to support The War Amps activities but also to raise awareness of the Association among the public. Canadians who attach a War Amps tag to a set of keys or other valuables can feel assured that these important items will be returned to them if lost.

Together with the Address Label Service, introduced in 1972 to thank donors for their support and to provide year‑round employment for people with disabilities at the sheltered workshop, the Key Tag Service continues to be a pillar of  The War Amps. To date, we have returned more than 1.5 million sets of lost keys – this year returning a total of 10,222 to their owners.

Tanya at work

Tanya works in The War Amps sheltered workshop where key tags and address labels are produced.


“Being part of  The War Amps gives me such a deep sense of pride, and now working at the Key Tag Service has made my journey with the Association come full circle.

“I became a Champ when I was nine years old after losing my left leg above the knee to cancer. Belonging to the CHAMP family taught me to be confident, to not let anything stop me, to overcome obstacles and most importantly, to be myself. I have made lifelong friends starting from my very first CHAMP Seminar. We support each other, teach each other and listen to each other’s experiences living with amputation.

“Thank you to our extended family, our donors, who make dreams come true. From simple things like being able to swim in the ocean or run around a track, it’s because of you that kids are smiling.”

Tanya, Key Tag Service employee

Did You Know?

Key Tags
  • All key tags and address labels are produced in-house and prepared for mailing at our sheltered workshop in Canada.
  • Hundreds of people with disabilities have worked at our sheltered workshop.
  • The War Amps respects your privacy. We are ISO 27001:2013 certified for the operation of an information security management system to protect donor and key tag information.

“As more information is reported in the media about the replacement cost of smart keys and key fobs, the desire to protect keys has been increasing.”

David Saunders, War Amps Chief Operating Officer

Financials

CHAMP Austin

Your support brings a bright smile to the faces of child amputees like Austin.

The War Amps has been continued under the Canada Not‑for‑profit Corporations Act and is registered as a charitable organization with the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). The War Amps is funded by donations to the Key Tag Service. It does not receive government grants.

Since 1918, The War Amps has met the needs of war amputees. Today, the Association continues to serve them, and all Canadian amputees, including children. The Child Amputee (CHAMP) Program provides financial assistance for artificial limbs, regional seminars and peer support. Through CHAMP, The War Amps tradition of “amputees helping amputees” will continue long into the future.

Public support of the Key Tag Service enables the Association to continue to operate its many programs.

As part of  The War Amps commitment to being accountable to our donors, we are pleased to provide you with our Essential Financial Information. The intent of this financial summary is to provide the most valuable data for our donors in terms of explaining our programs and how their money is being spent.

The War Amps has a unique structure within the charitable field. In 1946, the Key Tag Service was launched to provide employment for returning amputee veterans from the Second World War. This service was recognized as a sheltered workshop at that time. Throughout the intervening years, hundreds of Canadians with disabilities have worked at the Key Tag Service, which continues today. Employees at the Key Tag Service make competitive wages and help provide a service to Canadians that generates funds for the Association.

All of this detailed financial information is provided in our annual filing of form T3010, which is available to the public on the CRA website. Our full, audited financial statement is also available.

The War Amps financial statements are prepared and audited by the respected, international accounting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC). They also prepare our annual filing of the T3010 government return.

We are continually evaluating how we present our financial information in order to ensure that we provide our donors with the facts they need to make a well‑informed decision.

The War Amps is proud of its history and the programs and services we offer to amputees. Public support of the Key Tag Service, which has returned more than 1.5 million sets of lost keys, enables the Association to continue to operate its many programs, such as the CHAMP Program for child amputees, the National Service Bureau for war amputees and seriously disabled veterans, the National Amputee Centre for adult amputees and Advocacy, ensuring the rights and interests of amputees.

Statement of Revenue and Expense

for the year ended December 31, 2017

Revenue
Donations (Net) $16,322,575
Bequests 5,269,231
Interest and Other 649,885
$22,241,691
Expense
Adult Amputee Program $2,998,448
CHAMP Program 9,202,983
DRIVESAFE™ Program 186,205
PLAYSAFE™ Program 2,620,557
Prosthetics, Research and Education 469,535
Service Bureau 2,518,678
Veterans Issues – Special 435,323
Widows Assistance Program 612,602
Other Charitable Programs 556,019
Administrative 328,963
$19,929,313
Excess of Revenue Over Expense
(Expense Over Revenue) $2,312,378

Balance Sheet

as at December 31, 2017

Assets
Cash and Term Deposits (See Note 1) $32,768,207
Property and Equipment 5,739,792
Assets Held for Pension Liability 5,783,733
Other Assets 6,429,323
$50,721,055
Liabilities
Accounts Payable $4,679,966
Pension Liability 8,914,363
$13,594,329
Equity
Equity in Property Equipment $5,739,792
Appropriated Equity (See Note 2) 28,080,000
Unappropriated Net Assets (Deficiency of Net Assets)
(See Note 3)
3,158,524
Externally Restricted for Endowment Purposes 148,410
$37,126,726
$50,721,055

Notes to Financial Statements

for the year ended December 31, 2017

  1. Cash and Term Deposits

    The Association receives a significant portion of its funding immediately prior to the year end. These funds are used to finance the operations of its charitable activities in the ensuing year.

  2. Appropriated Equity

    CHAMP Program $28,000,000
    Survivors’ Subsistence Grants 80,000
    $28,080,000

    The National Board of Directors has approved appropriations to:

    1. Provide for long‑term commitments made on behalf of children enrolled in the Child Amputee (CHAMP) Program.
    2. Provide survivors’ subsistence grants of $2,000 per member on the death of an active member and $1,000 on the death of the spouse. Payment of these grants is at the discretion of the Association on the basis of need.
  3. Unappropriated Net Assets

    This is the unencumbered surplus available at year-end.

Still Much to Do!

CHAMPs with 100 sign

Today, there is still much to do to ensure amputees have the artificial limbs they need to lead independent and active lives. The CHAMP Program, which is unique in the world, and the Association’s many other vital programs, serve more amputees than ever in life‑changing ways.

Looking ahead to the next 100 years, The War Amps builds on the strong foundation laid down by the war amputee veterans who established the Association and continues to serve and advocate for all amputees.

The philosophy of “amputees helping amputees” is upheld and imparted by our Regional Representatives across the country who help with local outreach in their provinces. All of them are CHAMP graduates who have had a long‑standing involvement with and dedication to the Association.

This work would not be possible without the public’s continued support of the Key Tag Service. Thanks to you, The War Amps legacy will carry on long into the future.

CHAMPs with 100 sign
Your Story

“My late father started giving to The War Amps in the early ’60s because he lost a brother in the war. As I got older, I took up the cause for the amazing work they do for children. When I lost my keys recently, they were returned to my mailbox two weeks later! I can’t say thank you enough to your organization. Great work.”

Brad

Executive

Chairman of the Board

Stuart Vallières

Chairman of the Board and National Director, Montreal Branch

Executive Committee

Brian N. Forbes, B.Comm., LL.B.

Chairman, Executive Committee

David Saunders, CPA, CA

Chief Operating Officer

Executive Subcommittee

Danita Chisholm

Executive Director, Communications and CHAMP Program

Lorraine Cornelius

Executive Director, Public Awareness

Darlene Quesnel

Executive Director, Internal Operations

Quebec Operations

Marlène Girard

Executive Director


National Board of Directors

Douglas Cushway

(Saskatchewan Branch)

W. J. Neil

(Manitoba Branch)

Michael S. Krulicki

(Waterloo-Wellington Branch)

Robert Gondek

(Toronto Branch)

Charles Veilleux

(Quebec Branch)